It’s not that I have spent a great deal of time in Germany. In fact, right now I’m only in the middle of a work trip to Berlin, meaning a lot more time is spent in conference rooms on laptops than out and about. Before this, I only took one weekend trip to Germany, and passed through it briefly during road trips, so all in all, I’ve barely scratched the surface – hardly helped by my general pursuit of the French language, and subsequent greater interest in Francophone countries. So why a food feature on Germany?

I only studied German for two years at school, before dropping it in favour of French. I’d been exposed to French for much longer, and German just felt harder, with the neuter in particular causing more problems than I felt it was worth. But then I went to university to study Classics, which naturally included Latin – and once you’ve studied Latin intensely for a few years, your openmindedness towards things like the neuter is increased, and it doesn’t seem so tricky anymore. So I feel I owe it to Germany to take more of an interest in its language and culture. Plus, German food seems to have drawn the short straw in terms of international reputation when compared to its nearest rivals: Spain! France! Italy! In the hope of debunking this a little, I hereby list, in the tradition of my Ferret Food From France post, my top 5 savoury and top 5 sweet foods from Germany:

  • currywurst

    Currywurst. It’s stodgy, covered in ketchup, completely unsophisticated, and I love it. It’s basically traditional German sausage, sliced thickly, drenched in spicy tomato sauce, and served with French fries. So bad, and yet so good.

  • Bratkartoffeln. Everyone loves fried potatoes, bacon, and fried onions, right? Well, imagine all three of these IN ONE DISH. That’s Bratkartoffeln. The potatoes soak up all of the bacon fat too, so it’s rich and flavourful (and probably quite unhealthy. BUT SHUSH.).
  • Hendl. Whole grilled chicken, marinated with pepper and other spices. What’s not to like?
  • Hasenpfeffer. A stew made from marinated rabbit.
  • Sauerbraten. A beef pot roast, basically, made with vinegar, water, spices and seasonings. A toss-up between this and Pfefferpothast (a peppered beef stew) for my final entry. It’s true that Germany is not a great place for vegetarians! But it’s the kind of food I like: wholesome, filling, and great for cold days.

And as for the desserts, it gets even better! My top 5:

  • lebkuchenLebküchen! Basically gingerbread, but done up oh so prettily, particularly at Christmas (see image, right). Comes in a variety of regional types – it can be dusted with sugar, covered in chocolate, studded with dried fruits… *drools* Dominostein is a worthy related mention: chocolate covered Lebkuchen with a jam and marzipan filling.
  • Stollen. A spiced, slightly bready cake dough mixed with marzipan and dried fruits, and then rolled into a log shape before being baked. Dusted with sugar before serving.
  • Prinzregententorte. A cake consisting of at least six very thin layers of sponge, alternating with chocolate and cream. Like a French Opéra cake or Hungarian Dobostorte, this one is a regal classic.
  • Zwetschgenkuchen. A plum cake. YUMMY.
  • Bratapfel. Quite simply, baked apples. One of your five a day, and so simple to recreate at home – everyone’s a winner!

Doughnuts also get an honourable mention. They are VERY popular here, whether in the form of the Berliner (a basic jam doughnut), Kreple (traditional doughnuts from the Silesia region), or simply the fact that Dunkin’ Donuts has many outlets in Germany. I popped in out of curiosity yesterday (no Dunkin’ Donuts in France!) and suffice it to say that a showdown post pitting them against Krispy Kremes will be coming shortly.

In short, though, donuts aside, I’m not sure that Germany deserves its slightly lower reputation for its cuisine. And with winter drawing in, it’s a perfect time to try out a few recipes to see you through the colder weather.

Advertisements